Chess Puzzle 5

White mates in 2 moves:
(Tip: You can drag the pieces around! Just click “Reset Puzzle” to restart.)



Credit: Futility Closet    

Chess Puzzle 4

White mates in 4 moves:
(Tip: You can drag the pieces around! Just click “Reset Puzzle” to restart.)

Credit: ChessDailyNews

   

Chess Puzzle 3

A puzzle with a twist by F. Amelung, 1897 – White mates in 2 moves
(there’s a hint for this one!):

(Tip: You can drag the pieces around! Just click “Reset Puzzle” to restart.)

Credit: Evans, Larry (1974). Evans On Chess. New York, NY.: Cornerstone Library.
 
   
 
   
 

Chess And The Age Factor

Nautilus Magazine has an interesting article titled “Learning Chess At 40” that describes the travails of author Tom Vanderbilt as he attempts to learn chess at the “ripe old age” (for Chess anyway!) of 40 at the same time as his 4-year-old daughter.

Dad_Daughter_ChessEven after hiring a coach and following along with lessons together, Tom could very easily notice the acceleration with which his daughter progressed while he lagged behind:

Chess—which has been dubbed the “fruit fly” of cognitive psychology—seems a tool that is purpose-built to show the deficits of an aging brain. The psychologist Timothy Salthouse has noted that cognitive tests on speed, reasoning, and memory show age-related declines that are “fairly large,” “linear,” and, most alarming to me, “clearly apparent before age 50.” And there are clear consequences on the chessboard. In one study, Charness had players of a variety of skills try and assess when a check was threatened in a match. The more skilled the player, the quicker they were able to do this, as if it were a perceptual judgment—essentially by pattern recognition stored up from previous matches. But no matter what the skill, the older a player was, the slower they were to spot the threat of a check.

There’s a reason this article falls under the Biology|Neuroscience section of the magazine – there’s a lot of talk of fluid vs crystallized intelligence, younger vs older novices and even how neural connections are made.

Read the whole article which only reinforces the already evident conclusion: when comes to chess, younger brains are much more superior and adept than aging (35+!) ones.

Chess Puzzle 2

A neat little miniature – White mates in 2 moves:
(Tip: You can drag the pieces around! Just click “Reset Puzzle” to restart.)

Credit: Evans, Larry (1974). Evans On Chess. New York, NY.: Cornerstone Library.

   

Chess Puzzle 1

White to play and win:
(Tip: You can drag the pieces around! Just click “Reset Puzzle” to restart.)

Credit: Lasker, E., & Mitchell, D. A. (1965). Common sense in chess. New York, NY.: Dover.

   

The Immortal Game

The Immortal Game. Played between Adolf Anderssen and Lionel Kieseritzky on 21 June 1851 – so long ago in fact, that at the time Black moved first. So, why “Immortal”? Well, according to Wikipedia:

The bold sacrifices made by Anderssen to secure victory have made it one of the most famous chess games of all time. Anderssen gave up both rooks and a bishop, then his queen, checkmating his opponent with his three remaining minor pieces. The game has been called an achievement “perhaps unparalleled in chess literature”.

See for yourself!

Welcome To Chess Medley!

Hello and welcome!

Chess Medley is a curated site with assorted little chess delights from around the web. From opening traps to middle-game magic, endgame encounters to tactics, strategies and brilliancies – hopefully a good number of these will eventually find their way onto these pages.

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